Alisa Nelson

Alisa Nelson

News Director

University of Nebraska

Why do you work in radio news?

I grew up listening to Paul Harvey on the radio. My dad watched the television news every night at 5, 6, and 10. He read the Omaha World-Herald each day of the week. My favorite part of radio news is what I learned as a child and what I learn each day while delivering the news. I believe the news over the airwaves is critical to informing people about what is going on in their community. Whether bad weather is headed their way, a legislative bill seeks to impact crime in their neighborhood, or Warren County getting hundreds of new jobs, these stories impact everyday Missourians.

Which of your previous jobs taught you the most?

I have obtained several valuable skills from each job I’ve had – and each one has been very different. I have been a radio DJ. I have reported news on both radio and television. I have been in charge of education, public relations, operations, and fundraising for an animal shelter. Each job requires a very different set of skills that have helped me with problem solving, multi-tasking skills, staying grounded, and approaching every story with care.

If you were to work in another field entirely, what would your dream job be?

I don’t think I could stay away from writing. I would author books: one designed to bring comfort to military spouses; another to help families dealing with Alzheimer’s disease and similar memory challenges; and a children’s book about dogs. I could see myself also writing a regular blog or building a platform to help comfort military spouses and families with Alzheimer’s patients. I would probably have to win the lottery or my husband would have to find a pot of gold to be able to afford this dream.

Bill Pollock

Bill Pollock

Sports Director; Show Me Today Host

Columbia College, Chicago

Why do you work in radio news?

So my wife can’t yell at me for watching too much sports.

Which of your previous jobs taught you the most?

When I was in college, I worked for my brother’s painting business and learned two things. 1) manual labor is very difficult and 2) never work for your family!!!

If you were to work in another field entirely, what would your dream job be?

I’d become the first three-sports professional athlete excelling in baseball, hockey and golf.

Marshall GriffIn

Marshall GriffIn

Anchor-Reporter

University of Mississippi

Why do you work in radio news?

It’s important to inform the public about what’s happening in their community, and what their elected leaders and people with power and influence are doing. Radio, in my opinion, is the quickest and most efficient way to relay that information.

Which of your previous jobs taught you the most?

Probably my former job as State Capitol Reporter for St. Louis Public Radio. I had to learn first-hand about everything involved in how an idea becomes a bill and, in the end, a new law – and how to communicate that process to the listening audience.

If you were to work in another field entirely, what would your dream job be?

Aside from being in a world-famous rock band, I’d probably want to be a storm chaser. I got to do a scaled-back version of storm chasing while covering hurricanes in both Florida and Mississippi earlier in my career.

Cameron Conner

Cameron Conner

Producer-Anchor

University of Missouri

Why do you work in radio news?

Radio news reflects to my passion for storytelling and connecting. I am always looking for angles that present the opportunity to share something special with the world.

Which of your previous jobs taught you the most?

Working for more than two years at KFRU 98.9 FM and 1400 AM as a sports talk show host and high school football play-by-play anchor taught me the vast potential of a microphone. Authenticity is a journalist’s most significant asset. It also taught me the value of teamwork and the product that can be displayed with patience and persistence.

If you were to work in another field entirely, what would your dream job be?

Storytelling is my passion. I would seek those stories differently if the beautiful broadcast world did not exist. If you combine that with my immense passion for sports, you might find me as the owner of your neighborhood sports bar, ready to serve and spark up a conversation.

Anthony Morabith

Anthony Morabith

Anchor-Reporter

Baldwin Wallace University

Why do you work in radio news?

In addition to earning broadcast awards, my news career has afforded me the opportunity to be backstage at concerts and parades. I have gotten the opportunity to shake hands and rub elbows with politicians and congressmen to celebrities, rock stars, professional athletes, and everyday people.

Which of your previous jobs taught you the most?

My previous jobs have taught me the importance of news. My last job I had the opportunity to run a news department in Alaska. There, I learned that people didn’t watch the television or read the newspaper, they only had access to the radio, in fact they depended on it for their daily living. Because news is so important when people still depend on broadcast radio, I learned the importance of reporting with accuracy, honesty and doing so without setting some sort of agenda.

If you were to work in another field entirely, what would your dream job be?

Proclaiming the truth with accuracy and conviction! Outside of my job as a news anchor/reporter, I’m also a pastor. So, if news never worked out, I would focus full-time on ministry, preaching the gospel either in a pulpit or overseas.

 

Ashley Byrd

Ashley Byrd

Learfield Director of News Services

University of South Carolina

Why do you work in radio news?

From the first time I heard a spoken word news story on the radio, I was hooked.  I have experience in all media, including photography, but sending one’s voice through the air has always amazed and thrilled me. Then, there are the people I meet and the places I see. It’s a great job for the curious, which I am.

Which of your previous jobs taught you the most?

I spent a few years as a TV writing and producer in public broadcasting. There, I learned how to plan for ALL elements in a story. It also confirmed for me that radio reporting is efficient, creative and demands much of the storyteller. Whenever I covered a hurricane, an ice storm, a riot, an earthquake, radio was the most immediate.

If you were to work in another field entirely, what would your dream job be?

I’d return to my rock-and-roll days. But I’d be wiser and healthier this time!