August 23, 2014

Missourians cleaning up, getting power back after storms

The wave of severe storms that swept south through the state Monday evening through Tuesday morning downed trees and power poles and damaged some structures.

Monday's storm damaged a warehouse at the Second Chance animal rescue in Boonville.  (photo courtesy; Second Chance's Facebook page)

Monday’s storm damaged a warehouse at the Second Chance animal rescue in Boonville. (photo courtesy; Second Chance’s Facebook page)

No injuries have been reported, and National Weather Service meteorologist Mike July says that’s fortunate.

“I think the word got out to quite a few people. The media did a good of letting everybody know what was going on,” says July.

The storm took a quarter of the roof off of a warehouse at the Second Chance animal rescue in Boonville, who was seeking help Tuesday morning to clean up, and damaged the roof of the gymnasium at Blair Oaks High School in Wardsville. Windows were blown out of three store fronts in Hannibal and two power poles caught fire in Sedalia due to high winds.

At one time, more than 75,000 Missourians had been without power. As of 3:30 Tuesday afternoon, more than 3,700 customers of Ameren Missouri and Kansas City Power and Light were still without power.

The storm did not rise to the levels of a derecho, as the National Weather Service had been concerned it might.

Storms leave wind damage, 75,000 without power

A line of damaging storms hundreds of miles long continues to sweep south through Missouri. The storms have downed trees and power lines, caused some flooding and left tens of thousands of Missourians without power.

Storms continue to sweep south through the state and are still prompting the issuance of severe thunderstorm warnings.  (image courtesy; WeatherTap Zoom)

Storms continue to sweep south through the state and are still prompting the issuance of severe thunderstorm warnings. (image courtesy; WeatherTap Zoom)

Winds along the front of the storm were consistently between 50 and 75 miles per hour through Monday night and early Tuesday morning. Wind damage has been reported throughout the state. Some of the most significant reports came out of Hannibal, where law enforcement reported store front windows were broken out of three stores and several cars were moved, and in Sedalia, where two power poles caught fire as high winds whipped their lines.

At 2:30 a.m., Kansas City Power and Light reported more than 38,000 customers in Missouri without power, Ameren Missouri reported more than 22,000 customers without power in the St. Louis area and in central and north-central Missouri, and more than 15,000 customers of Columbia Water and Light were without power. The storms were only beginning to reach the Springfield area at that time.

For National Weather Service information for your area including watches and warnings, visit these NWS pages.

In northwest and western Missouri:  Kansas City (Pleasant Hill)

In northeast and eastern Missouri:  St. Louis

In southwest Missouri:  Springfield

In southeast Missouri:  Paducah, KY

Scotland and Clark counties:  Davenport, IA

Severe storms continue, bring damage to Missouri

Storms are continuing to sweep south and east through Missouri and bring with them prolonged, potentially damaging winds. Winds of 50 to 70 miles an hour have been reported as the storms have advanced from northern Missouri.

Radar images from the Springfield (left) and St. Louis NWS radar, courtesy of Weathertap zoom.

Radar images from the Springfield (left) and St. Louis NWS radar, courtesy of Weathertap zoom.

Power has been reported out at times in several communities including Weston, Marshall, Sedalia and Columbia. The Pettis County Sheriff’s Department reported two power poles on fire since 11 p.m.

Reports of wind damage have included trees, limbs and power lines down and shingles off of roofs.

Some flooding has also been reported, particularly in areas where storm drains were overwhelmed by high rainfall totals in brief periods. An emergency manager in Kansas City says crews have been sent to a reported water rescue situation at the corner of 9th and Winner Road.

The Weather Service is warning of continuing flood possibilities and some warnings have been issued. Officials urge motorists not to drive into flooded roadways.

For National Weather Service information for your area including watches and warnings, visit these NWS pages.

In northwest and western Missouri:  Kansas City (Pleasant Hill)

In northeast and eastern Missouri:  St. Louis

In southwest Missouri:  Springfield

In southeast Missouri:  Paducah, KY

Scotland and Clark counties:  Davenport, IA

NWS UPDATE: widespread wind damage/derecho event appearing to develop

An update from the National Weather Service in Pleasant Hill says conditions appear to be coming together for a widespread damaging wind/derecho event impacting northern Missouri. The system is also impacting southern Nebraska and northern Kansas.

Radar image from 9:05pm

Radar image from 9:05pm

Storms have caused the issuance of several severe thunderstorm warnings and two flash flood warnings in parts of northwest Missouri.  Trees have been reported down near Cainsville, Bethany and Trenton.

Thunderstorm activity is said to be rapidly growing ahead of an advancing cold front that will eventually interact with a low-level jet that continues to strengthen.

The Weather Service is concerned that instability near the I-70 corridor could lead to widespread and potentially significant wind damage, continuing as storms spread from northern Missouri into central and eastern Missouri overnight. Central Missouri could see “enhanced” wind damage and possible tornadoes.

There is also significant concern about heavy rain and flash flooding.

For National Weather Service information for your area including watches and warnings, visit these NWS pages.

In northwest and western Missouri:  Kansas City (Pleasant Hill)

In northeast and eastern Missouri:  St. Louis

In southwest Missouri:  Springfield

In southeast Missouri:  Paducah, KY

Scotland and Clark counties:  Davenport, IA

Severe weather likely tonight, could become a derecho

Severe weather is expected in Missouri tonight, and now the National Weather Service is concerned storms could come together to form a derecho.

This graphic from the National Weather Service shows the potential threats from severe weather tonight.

This graphic from the National Weather Service shows the potential threats from severe weather tonight.

A derecho is a long-lived, widespread, straight line wind storm. Such events have drawn national media attention including last week, when a derecho that swept across several midwestern states caused multiple tornadoes, heavy rain and widespread damage and has been blamed for five deaths and numerous injuries.

Meteorologist Mike July stresses that the formation of such a storm is possible and not definite.  Whether a derecho forms or not, severe weather is likely, and he wants Missourians to be prepared.

“Continue to monitor your local media because storms haven’t formed yet, and once they begin to form we’ll kind of see how they evolve,” says July. “If they begin to show signs that we look for, then we’ll have to maybe ramp things up a little bit.”

If the system evolves as some computer models say it will, it could produce winds of 70 miles per hour or more.

“Right now we’re kind of thinking in excess of 75 miles an hour winds are certainly possible, and it’s highlighted from an area southeast of Nebraska all the way over to St. Louis, so it’s a fairly wide corridor,” says July.

The public can often be dismissive of straight-line winds as a threat, but a prolonged straight-line wind even can be as damaging or more so than a tornado.

“In a tornado, if you kind of think of it in real estate coverage, it’s a small area that it covers,” says July. “If you’re talking about a true derecho, it could very well be, from the north end to the south end, it could be 100 to 200 miles long, and along that entire length you’re getting damaging winds.”

There is also a threat of flash flooding.

“We’re talking about one to three inches of rain possibly, and even from a localized area, four inches of rain,” says July. “We have multiple hazards to be concerned about this evening.

For National Weather Service information for your area, visit these NWS pages.

In northwest and western Missouri:  Kansas City (Pleasant Hill)

In northeast and eastern Missouri:  St. Louis

In southwest Missouri:  Springfield

In southeast Missouri:  Paducah, KY

Scotland and Clark counties:  Davenport, IA