October 31, 2014

US AG: Michael Brown grand jury leakers need to ‘shut up’

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder says whoever has been leaking information from the grand jury investigation of the Michael Brown shooting needs to “shut up.”

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder speaks at the 6th annual Washington Ideas Forum.

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder speaks at the 6th annual Washington Ideas Forum.

Holder spoke about the investigation during the Washington Ideas Forum.

“That part of the investigation is being done by the state and local authorities,” says Holder. He notes the Justice Department has a separate and independent investigation, “and we’ve not seen any leaks there. Whoever the sources of the leaks are need to shut up.”

Holder includes the release by the Ferguson Police Department of surveillance footage of Brown at a convenience store not long before he was shot among information he thinks shouldn’t have been released.

“These are all the kinds of things that I think are inappropriate. I’ve said I’m exasperated. That’s a nice way of saying I’m mad,” says Holder. “These leakers have made the determination they’re trying to somehow shape public opinion about this case, and that’s inconsistent with the way in which we conduct investigations and especially grand jury investigations, which are supposed to be secret.”

Holder also talked about the Ferguson Police Department, which he says needs to be reformed.

“I think it’s pretty clear,” says Holder, “that the need for wholesale change in that department is appropriate. Exactly what the forms of that change will be, I think we’ll wait until we complete our inquiry.”

Holder is on his way out as Attorney General, having said he will resign as soon as a successor is confirmed.

Missouri DOT looking for potentially deadly guardrails (AUDIO)

The state Transportation Department has started looking at all of its guardrails to see if the ends have a manufacturing flaw that can turn them into spears.

A section of Guardrail (file)

A section of Guardrail (file)

The department says it has seen enough incidents in Missouri and in other states to make it suspend buying guardrail end caps from one of its suppliers. MODOT’s Engineering Policy Administrator Joe Jones says the department has developed a database with GPS locations of tens of thousands of guardrail ends in the state.  Department workers started checking those locations this week.

Jones says most guardrails are for motorists who would rather hit them than something else on the road. “The end of the guard rail itself has to be treated.  If we didn’t treat that and you ran into it with your car,  it would have a very good chance of spearing right through the car,” he says.

The ends are supposed to absorb impact and the rail is supposed to bend and spread.  But some lawsuits say guardrail ends made by a Texas company has a design flaw that doesn’t let the rail absorb the impact. At least one fatality has been attributed to that design.

Jones says the first step in dealing with the issue is to check every guardrail end in the state and identify the ones from Trinity Industries, a company the department has used for almost twenty years. Jones says the problem segments appear to have been made in 2005.

AUDIO: Jones interview 8:28

NY Times explores relationship between Missouri AG Koster, lobbyists

A New York Times investigation into the lobbying of Attorneys General has focused a great deal on Missouri’s Attorney General.

Attorney General Chris Koster

Attorney General Chris Koster

The Times leads off by reporting that Attorney General Chris Koster halted an investigation of false claims by the makers of 5-Hour Energy drinks after a lobbyist for the company spoke to him at an event in California.

The Times reports that lobbyist’s firm, its clients and its partners have donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to Koster, a candidate for Missouri Governor in 2016, in some cases while his office was investigating those companies. He has also been included in public service ads sponsored by the firm and has spoken at public events it hosted.

Koster tells the Times he felt the suit lacked merit and denies that contributions or relationships prompted any of his office’s decisions that appear to benefit the firm’s clients.

House Speaker Tim Jones has issued a statement calling the situations outlined in the article “egregious” and saying he is looking into how the House can investigate the findings of the article.

Read the Times’ article here

“Mr. Mizzou,” John Kadlec dead at 86. Kadlec spent 50 years associated with the university as a player, coach, administrator and broadcaster (AUDIO)

Former University of Missouri football player and assistant football coach John Kadlec, shown in this April 12, 2014 file photo, had died at the age of 86 in Columbia, Missouri on October 29, 2014. A native of St. Louis, Kadlec was recruited by legendary Mizzou Head Coach Don Faurot. He was an all-conference lineman during his time at Mizzou and went on to serve as an assistant football coach under Faurot as well as Frank Broyles, Dan Devine and Al Onofrio.   UPI/FILES/Bill Greenblatt

Former University of Missouri football player and assistant football coach John Kadlec, shown in this April 12, 2014 file photo, had died at the age of 86 in Columbia, Missouri on October 29, 2014. A native of St. Louis, Kadlec was recruited by legendary Mizzou Head Coach Don Faurot. He was an all-conference lineman during his time at Mizzou and went on to serve as an assistant football coach under Faurot as well as Frank Broyles, Dan Devine and Al Onofrio. UPI/FILES/Bill Greenblatt

John Kadlec died early Wednesday morning in Columbia at the age of 86.

He first came to Mizzou from his native St. Louis, Mo. to play football for Hall of Fame Coach Don Faurot in 1947.  After earning his degree from MU, he stayed on as a graduate assistant coach for Faurot, and he coached the freshman team until 1954 when he moved up to varsity, where he served through 1969.  After a stint at Kansas State from 1960-66, Kadlec returned to Mizzou to serve on the staffs of Dan Devine and Al Onofrio, coaching from 1966-77 on the Tiger sideline.

After his coaching days ended, Kadlec returned to Kansas State as Director of Development, before coming home to Mizzou in 1986 as Director of the Tiger Scholarship Fund, and he was a fixture in Columbia ever since in numerous roles for Athletics, most closely associated with fundraising.

In 1995, Kadlec became the color analyst for Mizzou Football games on the Tiger Radio Network as an emergency replacement when the spot came open unexpectedly just days before the season opener.  At the request of former Director of Athletics Joe Castiglione, Kadlec joined Mike Kelly on the call for what he thought would be a one-game stint that ended up lasting 16 seasons in all, until he put down the microphone after the 2010 season.

Kadlec was a 1996 inductee into the MU Athletics Hall of Fame, and in 2005, the grass practice fields behind the Mizzou Athletics Training Complex were named in his honor.

Service information is not yet finalized, but will be passed along as soon as it is available.

Hear a sample of some of John’s more colorful moments on the Tiger Network with Mike Kelly.  (Courtesy/Learfield Sports)

 

Director of Athletics Mike Alden

“John Kadlec was a special person. He was one of those rare people who made everyone feel special. The way he could light up a room was really something to see. He loved Mizzou so much and was such a blessing to those of us who had the good fortune of being part of his life. I worked closely with Coach on many issues over the years, and he never hesitated to be direct, supportive and straightforward. His honesty and candor were his trademarks. I’ll always treasure my time with him and his family. There will never be another person like John Kadlec We will miss him.”

Head Football Coach Gary Pinkel

“Coach was such an amazing man, he was an absolute treasure for anyone who knew him. For me personally, he was someone I could always talk to, he always had some great wisdom to share, and he was always there for me in the toughest times. He was a ball coach, plain and simple, and he loved Mizzou with all he was worth. It’s hard to put into words how much he’ll be missed.”

Mike Kelly, Voice of the Tigers and longtime broadcast partner

“I can’t imagine a more dedicated servant to the University of Missouri than John Kadlec. He was such an impressive man, all the years he devoted to Mizzou and to the football program he loved so much, and the impact he had on the lives of thousands of people, including me, was just amazing. He was a devoted husband, father, and friend to so many. It’s heartbreaking to lose him, but somebody like Kaddy will never be forgotten.”

Story courtesy, Mizzou Athletics

Nearly 200 apply in one week for Ferguson Commission

The response to Governor Jay Nixon’s call for the formation of a Ferguson Commission has been strong.

Governor Jay Nixon (courtesy; UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Governor Jay Nixon (courtesy; UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

By Tuesday morning, one week after Nixon announced the commission, 199 people had applied online to be a member. Nixon wants the group to look at the “challenges that were exposed and exacerbated by the death of Michael Brown and its aftermath, and offer specific recommendations for overcoming them.”

By the weekend, Nixon’s office tweeted that the response was “overwhelming.” His official Twitter feed added that he is, “Inspired by St. Louisans’ willingness to step up and serve.”

Nixon told reporters that the commission would have about 15 members, whose selection would be announced in November.

Those who want to apply can do so on the state’s website.

Earlier story: Nixon:  new ‘Ferguson Commission’ will seek lessons from unrest