October 31, 2014

You may suffer from Adult Onset Hunting. You’re not alone. Join others who are also ready to try hunting for the first time. (VIDEO)

Bill Pollock, (left) work with another student during a recent Skills Session, hosted by the Missouri Department of Conservation.

Bill Pollock, (left) works with another student during a recent Skills Session, hosted by the Missouri Department of Conservation.

Sponsored by the Missouri Department of Conservation

It’s fall.  The temperatures are cooling, colors are changing and now is the time to get out and enjoy the great outdoors of Missouri.  Of course, you know this is also the time of year many Missourians are getting ready for their annual hunting excursions.  For some of us, like myself, we’ve missed out on all the enjoyment hunting provides.  Today, that changes.

Allow me to give you some background into what these upcoming features and videos are all about.

Over the summer, Missourinet teamed up with the Missouri Department of Conservation, in a series of Google Hangouts designed to inform hunters and the public on deer health and deer management.

I moderated the series of web chat videos. During one of the production meetings, I was asked if I was a hunter, to which I responded that I was not.  However, having been a resident of Missouri since 1995, a number of friends and acquaintances seemed like they were avid hunters and I felt left out.

I would hear the stories about their preparations for the upcoming season, the successes and failures of their hunts, and the fun times they had with friends and family.  I always made up excuses about why I couldn’t hunt.  I didn’t want to bother an experienced hunter by having me tag along.  I don’t know how to handle or shoot a firearm.  I don’t have the clothing, I’m not sure how to get started. It’s too expensive. The list went on and on.

As I shared my reasons with Karen Hudson, the Marketing Coordinator  for the Department of Conservation, she assured me that they were many adults who were in the same position that I was in.  She said it’s the goal of the department to expose as many new people to all the wonderful benefits that hunting has to offer.

So, from that small conversation, we are excited to take you through my journey as I learn the ins and outs of hunting.  The goal of this series is to answer all of your questions, through a hands-on interactive video series, which will show you how easy it is to get started in an activity that will last a lifetime.

These Google Hangouts are designed to take you from the very beginning of the process which includes becoming certified through hunter education and skill sessions, all the way through food preparation and making meals.

I have an interest in learning more about hunting from the sport aspect as well as wanting to be able to spend more time outdoors and enjoy nature.  I also know that through my success in the field, I’ll be allowed to share the harvest with families who are in need for food.  (We’ll cover more of this down the road).

You’ll also hear from Jessica, who very similar to me, grew up in a family that did not hunt and now she is ready to give it a try.  Jeff, a father of two young boys, learned to hunt because of their interest.  Finally, we’ll hear from Angela who is interested in discovering new food alternatives.  She feels that hunting may provide a healthy plan for her dietary needs.

Joining us from the Missouri Department of Conservation is Kyle Lairmore.  He is the Hunter Education & Shooting Range Coordinator.  Throughout the fall, Kyle is going to be our “go to guy.”  He’s going to take us step by step and not only tell us, but show us all we need to know about hunting.

I also encourage you to watch if you are an avid hunter.  Please realize there are several of us in the state dealing with “Adult Onset Hunting.”  You are a vital part to the health and success of our state’s conservation.  With your support, you can help others like myself enjoy the great outdoor experiences, Missouri has to offer.

Now, for you newbies…before you run out and buy your camo, and take off for the countryside  there are a few items we need to take care of first.

As I mentioned earlier, hunter education is required in Missouri, and it qualifies you to buy a firearms hunting permit.  Once you have your hunter-education certificate, you can buy a permit to hunt for deer, turkey, waterfowl, furbearers or small game.  After taking the hunter education portion online or in a booklet, we’ll head over to a required skill session where we’ll learn how to handle firearms and hunt safely.  Once you pass your test, you’re just about ready to go.

Enjoy our first Google Hangout and feel free to share your questions and comments below.  Be on the lookout for our next Google Hangout on November 13.

You can click for more information on Hunter Education and Skill Sessions.

If Mizzou cleans up their penalty issues on Saturday, there is no reason why the Tigers shouldn’t be able to run all over Kentucky (Google Hangout)

Missouri Tigers Russell Hansbrough dives into the endzone against the Vanderbilt Commadores in the second quarter at Farout Field in Columbia, Missouri on October 25, 2014.   UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Missouri Tigers Russell Hansbrough dives into the endzone against the Vanderbilt Commadores in the second quarter at Farout Field in Columbia, Missouri on October 25, 2014. UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Mizzou-Kentucky this Saturday, the Wildcats are much improved in terms of their record at 5-3, but they give up a ton of points in SEC play…they haven’t won on the road yet this year and they give up a bunch of rushing yards.  What a perfect team to help Mizzou snap out of their offensive funk.

So far in SEC play, here’s the total number of points the Wildcats have allowed:  36 to Florida, 38 to South Carolina, 41 to LSU and 45 to Mississippi State. It could mean big days for Russell Hansbrough and Marcus Murphy.   I talked with Shane Bailey of SECSportsRoundTable.com and  he agrees Kentucky can’t stop the run, but they are an improved team.

Mizzou has to cut down the penalties too, those are drive killers. 15 flags last week, many against the offensive line for false starts. Gary Pinkel said its simple…it comes down to focus and discipline.  If the Tigers bring that on Saturday and stay committed to the run, the Tigers could get into the low 30’s for points.

We break down the Wildcats on this Google Hangout.

New season of Mizzou basketball begins with an easy win over William Jewell as the Kim Anderson era gets rolling

The Kim Anderson era is underway at Mizzou (photo/Mizzou Athletics)

The Kim Anderson era is underway at Mizzou (photo/Mizzou Athletics)

The Mizzou men’s basketball team took the court on Wednesday night in the coaching debut of Kim Anderson with a 72-31 victory over William Jewell College.  Point guard Wes Clark had a game-high 14 points and added seven rebounds and three steals to lead the Tigers. In the paint, junior Ryan Rosburg had 13 points and a team-best eight boards. Ten different Tigers scored.

Defensively, Mizzou held William Jewell t0 17% shooting and  took a 30-17 lead into the halftime break.

In the final minutes, Tramaine Isabell hit a three-pointer and scored eight more points to close out the game.  The Tigers will continue exhibition play at Mizzou Arena against UMSL on Nov. 8 and open up the regular season Nov. 14 against UMKC.

Giants pull off the Show Me Sweep to end one of the most exciting baseball summers in Missouri

Madison Bumgarner is hugged by his catcher Buster Posey after beating the Royals in Game 7.  Bumgarner was named World Series MVP (photo/MLB)

Madison Bumgarner is hugged by his catcher Buster Posey after beating the Royals in Game 7. Bumgarner was named World Series MVP (photo/MLB)

San Francisco Giants starter Madison Bumgarner turned what could have been bried relief stint in Game 7 of the World Series to the near equivalence of another quality start…and probably could have kept on going.

On two days rest, but throwing on a normal side session day, Bumgarner dialed it up one more time and retired 14 Royals hitters in a row.  As the Royals did all season and even in the postseason against Oakland, they found a way to make it interesting.

Alex Gordon’s two out single in the bottom of the ninth, got past center fielder Gregor Blanco and rolled to the wall.  left fielder Juan Perez booted the ball on the track and Gordon motored to third.  Tying run, 90 feet away, game not over just yet.

But, Bumgarner came back to get Salvador Perez to foul out to third baseman Pablo Sandoval and the Royals lost Game 7 by a 3-2 final.

Bumgarner, for going 2-0  with a five-inning save and posting a 0.43 ERA in the World Series, took home the MVP honors.  He certainly deserved it.  It was helped along the way and I’m not making excuses, but the one thing Royals hitters displayed all season was discipline at the plate.

In this final game, the players were pressing, by continuing to chase balls up and out of the strike zone.  They swung at too many balls out of the zone, including the last at-bat for Perez, who would have drawn four straight balls had he kept the bat on the shoulder.

I could see and hear the frustration mount as Royals hitter after hitter popped up, struck out or hit the ball softly, Fox Sports could pick up the grunts and I could see the players slamming their bats.

Bumgarner flustered them all series.

The MVP for San Francisco, could have also gone to Hunter Pence.  Yes, Bumgarner was spectacular, but he was also aided by two, five-run victories.  Game 5 was a 2-0 game heading into the eighth, but a three-spot for San Fran in that game allowed him to finish up the complete game.

Pence had a seven game hit streak.  He found himself at the center of most rallies, getting 12 hits and three walks, driving in eight runs and scoring eight times.  Pence singled in both innings that the Giants scored.

In the end, it just came down to the Royals not having an answer for one pitcher.  Kelvin Herrera, Wade Davis and Greg Holland did their jobs again, combining for 5.2 innings of shutout ball as Herrera kept it a one-run game coming into rescue Jeremy Guthrie.

Its difficult to find disappointment in a team that poured their heart and soul into this season.

“Mr. Mizzou,” John Kadlec dead at 86. Kadlec spent 50 years associated with the university as a player, coach, administrator and broadcaster (AUDIO)

Former University of Missouri football player and assistant football coach John Kadlec, shown in this April 12, 2014 file photo, had died at the age of 86 in Columbia, Missouri on October 29, 2014. A native of St. Louis, Kadlec was recruited by legendary Mizzou Head Coach Don Faurot. He was an all-conference lineman during his time at Mizzou and went on to serve as an assistant football coach under Faurot as well as Frank Broyles, Dan Devine and Al Onofrio.   UPI/FILES/Bill Greenblatt

Former University of Missouri football player and assistant football coach John Kadlec, shown in this April 12, 2014 file photo, had died at the age of 86 in Columbia, Missouri on October 29, 2014. A native of St. Louis, Kadlec was recruited by legendary Mizzou Head Coach Don Faurot. He was an all-conference lineman during his time at Mizzou and went on to serve as an assistant football coach under Faurot as well as Frank Broyles, Dan Devine and Al Onofrio. UPI/FILES/Bill Greenblatt

John Kadlec died early Wednesday morning in Columbia at the age of 86.

He first came to Mizzou from his native St. Louis, Mo. to play football for Hall of Fame Coach Don Faurot in 1947.  After earning his degree from MU, he stayed on as a graduate assistant coach for Faurot, and he coached the freshman team until 1954 when he moved up to varsity, where he served through 1969.  After a stint at Kansas State from 1960-66, Kadlec returned to Mizzou to serve on the staffs of Dan Devine and Al Onofrio, coaching from 1966-77 on the Tiger sideline.

After his coaching days ended, Kadlec returned to Kansas State as Director of Development, before coming home to Mizzou in 1986 as Director of the Tiger Scholarship Fund, and he was a fixture in Columbia ever since in numerous roles for Athletics, most closely associated with fundraising.

In 1995, Kadlec became the color analyst for Mizzou Football games on the Tiger Radio Network as an emergency replacement when the spot came open unexpectedly just days before the season opener.  At the request of former Director of Athletics Joe Castiglione, Kadlec joined Mike Kelly on the call for what he thought would be a one-game stint that ended up lasting 16 seasons in all, until he put down the microphone after the 2010 season.

Kadlec was a 1996 inductee into the MU Athletics Hall of Fame, and in 2005, the grass practice fields behind the Mizzou Athletics Training Complex were named in his honor.

Service information is not yet finalized, but will be passed along as soon as it is available.

Hear a sample of some of John’s more colorful moments on the Tiger Network with Mike Kelly.  (Courtesy/Learfield Sports)

 

Director of Athletics Mike Alden

“John Kadlec was a special person. He was one of those rare people who made everyone feel special. The way he could light up a room was really something to see. He loved Mizzou so much and was such a blessing to those of us who had the good fortune of being part of his life. I worked closely with Coach on many issues over the years, and he never hesitated to be direct, supportive and straightforward. His honesty and candor were his trademarks. I’ll always treasure my time with him and his family. There will never be another person like John Kadlec We will miss him.”

Head Football Coach Gary Pinkel

“Coach was such an amazing man, he was an absolute treasure for anyone who knew him. For me personally, he was someone I could always talk to, he always had some great wisdom to share, and he was always there for me in the toughest times. He was a ball coach, plain and simple, and he loved Mizzou with all he was worth. It’s hard to put into words how much he’ll be missed.”

Mike Kelly, Voice of the Tigers and longtime broadcast partner

“I can’t imagine a more dedicated servant to the University of Missouri than John Kadlec. He was such an impressive man, all the years he devoted to Mizzou and to the football program he loved so much, and the impact he had on the lives of thousands of people, including me, was just amazing. He was a devoted husband, father, and friend to so many. It’s heartbreaking to lose him, but somebody like Kaddy will never be forgotten.”

Story courtesy, Mizzou Athletics